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Different Kinds of Foods


You are here : Home Nutrition Zone Different Kinds of Foods

Different Kinds of Foods

Different Kinds of Foods


Protein

Protein in the original Greek means "of first importance." The Greeks had it right! Proteincomplex chains of amino acids-is the basic building block of life and essential to almost every chemical reaction in the human body.

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Diet and Nutrition

Different Kinds of Foods

Daily Nutrition Menu

Vitamines and their Importance

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Food Source for Nutrition Nutrients

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Recommended Dietary Intakes

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for infants from 0 to 6 months

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for infants from 7 to 12 months

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Childrens from 1 to 3 years

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Childrens from 4 to 8 years

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Males from 9 to 13 years

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Males from 14 to 18 years

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Males from 19 to 30 years

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Males from 31 to 50 years

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Males from 51 to 70 years

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Males from 70+ (plus) years

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Females from 9 to 13 years

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Females from 14 to 18 years

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Females from 19 to 30 years

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Females from 31 to 50 years

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Females from 51 to 70 years

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Females from 70+ (plus) years

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Pregancy

-Recommended Dietary Intakes for Female Lactation

 

Weight and Measures in Nutrition

Food rich in protein includes meat, fish, fowl, eggs-most of which contain almost no carbohydrates-and cheese, nuts, and seeds. Many vegetables are also well supplied, but unlike animal foods, don't contain all the essential amino acids.



Fat
Fat provides glycerol and essential fatty acids, which the body cannot make. Fat is found in meat, fish, fowl, dairy products and the oils derived from nuts and seeds and a few vegetables such as avocados. Oils extracted from these foods represent one hundred percent fat and contain no carbohydrates.



Carbohydrate
Carbohydrate includes sugars and starches that are chains of sugar molecules. Although carbohydrate provides the quickest source of energy, we eat much more of it, by far, than our body needs to be healthy. Vegetables do contain some carbohydrates, but they also contain a wide and wondrous variety of vitamins and minerals. However, you can eat plenty of vegetables with high concentrations of beneficial nutrients and still control your carbs. On the other hand, carbohydrates such as those in sugar and white flour contain almost nothing that your body needs in large quantities.









Find nutrition values for common foods
 
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